A family in Illinois was horrified when the Nest security system they’d purchased to give them peace of mind was taken over by a hacker — the latest example of what the tech company has called a “third-party hack.”

Arjun Sud was outside of his son’s room on Sunday when he heard a man’s voice talking to his 7-month-old via the security system’s speaker, according to CBS.

“I was shocked to hear a deep, manly voice talking to my 7-month-old son,” Sud told CBS. “My blood ran cold.”

The hidden intruder was reportedly taunting Sud and his family, uttering obscenities that included the N-word. The family also believes the hacker jacked up their thermostat to 90 degrees.

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Sud’s wife called the incident “terrifying.”

The family, which has been using Nest for years, eventually unplugged all the cameras and called the police. They also called Nest.

“And then they said, ‘Well, you should have used a unique password and two-factor authentication, and if you did, you know, that would be that,'” Sud said.

Sud now questions Nest’s security.

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“When I called Nest and I said, ‘How long has this been going on for? How long has someone kind of been watching us?’ ‘We don’t know. We can’t tell you. We don’t have the logs,’” Sud told CBS.

In January, a California family was warned of an impending missile attack from North Korea after their Nest home security system was taken over by hackers.

A spokesperson for Google, the parent company of Nest, previously sent Fox News the following statement:

“These recent reports are based on customers using compromised passwords (exposed through breaches on other websites). In nearly all cases, two-factor verification eliminates this type of security risk.”

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The Google spokesperson continued: “We take security in the home extremely seriously, and we’re actively introducing features that will reject compromised passwords, allow customers to monitor access to their accounts and track external entities that abuse credentials.”

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